What is the 2035 Vision?

NOTE: THIS IS NO LONGER CURRENT, IT HAS BEEN REPLACED BY THE IMAGINE 2040 LONG RANGE TRANSPORTATION PLAN. THIS PAGE IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATION ONLY.

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The 2035 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) is a multi-modal plan full of choices that reflect and support the way we want to live and travel.

We are well-connected among places where people live, work, shop, and play in the Tampa Bay region.

Our accessible streets are lined with green and paved with space for people, bicycles, and motorized vehicles alike.

We have a variety of transportation choices, including rail, bus rapid transit, and other multimodal options.

We share rides, bike and walk securely, and deliver goods safely and on time.

We support local neighborhoods and the business community while competing in the global economy with our world-class port and aviation facilities.

Looking 25 years into the future, visualize a Tampa Bay where you can choose how you want to get around, whether it's walking, biking, driving, taking a bus, train, or even a ferry. Where communities are walkable and inviting, where you can breathe easier knowing we are taking care of the environment, where it's safe to let your kids walk or ride their bikes to school.  That's a place where we want to be and where we want our children to grow up.  To achieve this quality of life, we must look at how we grow and how we are connected.

The 2035 Long Range Transportation Plan is a multi-modal plan full of choices that reflect and support the way we want to live and travel.

What's in the Plan - By Area

 

What's Behind the Plan - Technical Memos

Transit Needs Assessment Segment Summaries (2010)

 

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Looking 25 years into the future, visualize a Tampa Bay where you can choose how you want to get around, whether it’s walking, biking, driving, taking a bus, a train, or even a ferry. Where communities are walkable and inviting. Where you can breathe easier knowing we are taking better care of the environment. Where it’s safe to let your kids walk or ride their bikes to school. That is a place we want to be, and where we want our children to grow up. A place that has clean air, public spaces that evoke a strong sense of community, and sustainable resources that support a strong economy. To achieve this quality of life, we must look at how we grow and how we are connected.

The Metropolitan Planning Organization is working with you to improve our livability, sustainability, mobility and accessibility. The vision for the future will include improvements in all types, or modes, of transportation, from walking and biking, to driving and riding on transit.

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bus rapid transit

We are faced with a substantial gap between probable funding and the cost of needed improvements. Based on studies and your comments, and considering federal, state and local sources of revenue anticipated to be available over the next 25 years, we used ten performance factors to score more than 500 candidate projects and determine which ones should be priorities. We then list the recommended top priority improvements to roads, transit service, bike lanes and trails, pedestrian facilities (sidewalks) and other projects.

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Save MONEY. $9,300.

Working families in our metro area spend about 1/3 of their household budget on transportation. That’s more than nearly any other region in the country. According to APTA, the American Public Transit Association, as of April 6, 2010, people who use public transportation can save up to $9,300 per year when you consider the cost of owning and operating a car. With more transportation choices available, many families would not have to own a second or third car. Some may even be able to not own a car at all!

Traffic RELIEF. $1,000,000,000.

Today, an average commuter in Tampa Bay spends an extra 46 hours per year sitting in traffic. This costs us a total of $1 billion annually. Even with the current slowdown of people moving to Florida, Hillsborough County is still growing and is expecting more than 500,000 new residents by 2035. With a 47% increase in population and 55% more jobs within Hillsborough County, the average delay on roadways will triple! In corridors where 8 new road lanes would be needed to meet this demand, rail is a cost effective strategy.

More JOBS. 47,500

An efficient transportation system is an economic engine and a job creator. Not only does transit attract new employers to our region – building it also creates jobs! According to APTA, for every billion dollars invested in public transportation, 47,500 jobs are supported, including construction, operations and maintenance, and secondary jobs from supplies and materials to feeding the hungry workers. For every dollar that’s invested in transit, research shows as much as $6 is generated in economic returns. In the economic times we are facing, that is a welcome statistic.

What is the Cost of Commuting?

Commuting Costs Can Negate Suburban Home Choices

By Shannon Behnken, The Tampa Tribune, 3/24/2010

Enticed by lower prices, many home buyers opt for long commutes to work, thinking it's worth the drive to the suburbs. But that's not always the case, according to a report from the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit Center for Neighborhood Technology.

Problem is, according to the study, many are spending more on transportation than they figured and, consequently, the home isn't affordable after all.

People in the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater metro area spend about $12,000 per household each year on transportation, the study said. (Those costs include car payments, gas and maintenance.) That's a whopping $13 billion a year. "Tampa Bay has attracted people because of its affordable housing prices," said Scott Bernstein, founder and president of the nonprofit. "

But the fact is people there are spending a lot on transportation.

Why is this bad?

Tampa Bay households making the area's median salary of $37,406 spend about 33 percent of their income on transportation and 25 percent on housing. Seventeen out of 28 regions studied spend more of their income on transportation than housing. The federal department of Housing and Urban Development recommends families spend no more than 30 percent of their income on housing.

"People seek locations to meet this goal, but they don't take into account the cost of transportation," said HUD deputy secretary Ron Sims. Using the 30 percent rule of thumb, the study shows, seven out of 10 U.S. communities, or 69 percent, are considered affordable. That shrinks to four out of 10, or 39 percent, when both housing and transportation costs are considered.

The nonprofit recommends families spend no more than 45 percent of their incomes on the two expenses.

So what should be done? The nonprofit urges governments to consider offering alternative means of transportation. Consumers, Bernstein said, should think about buying a home closer to work and shopping locations.

The nonprofit has also asked real estate agencies to include average transportation costs in home listings

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2035-LRTP-logoThe 2035 Plan was adopted in 2009 but is a "living" document, meaning that it changes from time to time.

The MPO Board may formally amend the Plan at any time.  On other occasions, staff may make administrative modifications.

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